The Olympics and the Jewish Question

They have started airing the television ads for the London Summer Olympics, and even a non-sports person like myself has to admit that, especially in high definition, it all looks very exciting.  The beauty.  The pageantry.  The thrill of victory.  The agony of defeat.  It makes one want to hop on an airplane and cross the pond to see it all in person!

However, with all the excitement that surrounds the coming Olympic games, for us as Jews, there is a certain bitterness as well.  In fact, the Olympic games have had more than their fair share of moments when they have been less than, shall we say, “Jew-friendly.”

Of course there was the Berlin Olympics of 1936, sometimes called the Nazi Olympics.  The entire world gathered in Berlin for these games, choosing to turn a blind eye on how, at that very same time, the Nazi regime was engaged in a ruthless and relentless attack upon the Jews of Germany.  Indeed, even though the Olympic charter expressly forbids any discrimination against athletes on the basis of race, religion, politics, or gender, the Nazis openly restricted membership on the German Olympic team to “Aryans only.”  Still, while there were those, especially here in the U.S., who called for a boycott of those games, no such boycott ever took place.  The games proceeded and all the nations of the world participated in them, in spite of the fact that the Nazis had transformed the Berlin games into a major Nazi propaganda coup.

Then there was the 1972 Munich Olympics; the first time the Olympics had returned to Germany since 1936.  Many who read these words will remember watching in horror the television coverage as this triumphal Olympic return to a reborn Germany turned into a Jewish nightmare as eight heavily armed Palestinian terrorists, members of the notorious Black September group, invaded the Olympic Village, initially killing two Israeli Olympians and taking nine others hostage, only to ultimately kill all of them as well in an abortive escape attempt.  During the whole affair, the games continued.  When, in the wake of this tragedy, there were those who called upon the International Olympic Committee to cancel the remainder of the games in memory of the murdered Israeli Olympic athletes, their request was denied.  The games were suspended, but only long enough to hold a memorial service, during which Avery Brundage, the head of the International Olympic Committee gave an address in which little reference was made to the murdered athletes.

This year marks the 40th anniversary of what has come to be known as the “Munich Massacre.”  There have been those, including members of the families of the murdered athletes, who have requested that at this year’s Olympic games, these athlete-victims be remembered by a moment of silence; a seemingly simple and dignified request.  Their request has been denied.  So much for one of the fundamental principles as stated in the Olympic charter as being:  “The goal of Olympism is to place sport at the service of the harmonious development of humankind, with a view to promoting a peaceful society concerned with the preservation of human dignity”!  40 years ago, these 11 Israeli athletes traveled to Munich to affirm this principle; to foster peace and human dignity through sports.  They died at the hands of those who blatantly spat in the face of that principle.  Today, rather than honor the memory of these Olympic martyrs, the International Olympic Committee prefers to obscure their memory, lest they offend those nations who support the murderers.  Knowing this, as Jews, how can we remain silent?  How can we join in ignoring this dark anniversary?  Please join me in protesting that decision.  You can make your voice be heard by writing to:

the International Olympic Committee

Château de Vidy

Case postale 356

1001 Lausanne

Switzerland.

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Explore posts in the same categories: 40rh Anniversary of the Munich Massacre, Antisemitism, Berlin Olympics, Black September Group, Hate, Holocaust, International Olympic Committee, Israel, London Olympics of 2012, Munich Massacre, Munich Olympics of 1972, Nazi Olympics of 1936, Olympic Charter, Olympics, Palestinians, Refusal to Memorialize the Victims of the Munich Massacre, Terrorism

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