Archive for the ‘Systemic Racism’ category

To Block or Not to Block on Facebook in a Time of Trump, COVID-19, Black Lives Matter and the Slide Toward Fascism

July 6, 2020
I am fortunate to have almost 1,500 friends on Facebook. Today I unfriended 1 of them. He is a nice person but I could no longer grant him a forum for his deeply disturbing rhetoric.
At this horrible juncture in history, when our lives are plagued by an uncontrolled lethal virus and our nation is exploding with the long delayed struggle over racial injustice, while a petty despot sits in the White House, focused solely on his own narcissitic ego as almost 3 million Americans have been infected by the virus & over 132,000 Americans have died from it; a President who does not believe in science, is dismantling the pillars of democracy at breakneck speed, has demonstrated himself through acts of cruelty & malice to be a racist, a sexist, a xenophobe, an Islamophobe, a homophobe, & if not an outright Antisemite, then one who surrounds himself with Antisemitic advisors; who is an inveterate liar, a vindictive bully, and has time & again chosen to embrace our nation’s totalitarian adversaries while he alienates our closest & dearest allies, no longer can I countenance those who defend him, his actions, his policies, and his ideologies.
With such a nightmare holding the reins of power in America, I can no longer tolerate listening to those who defend the horrors that surround us and the man who carries the most responsibility for either creating them or exacerbating them beyond and without end. Whether it be his tearing apart families & putting children in cages, his slamming the immigration doors to brown people literally fleeing for their lives, his dismantling the very laws that were set up to prevent to destruction of our natural environment, his attacks on the free press, his defunding public services such as the post office, his ordering of the tear gassing, pepper spraying, baton beating, and imprisoning of peaceful protesters for the “crime” of seeking equal justice under the law, his vigorous defense and exalting of those who have betrayed our nation and chose to take up arms against it in order to protect their “right” to maintain an entire people in a state of slavery, his active suppression of the American people’s right to vote in a national election, his actively provoking his fellow Americans to stand up in armed resistance to their own state governors and legislators, and, of course, in the face of the COVID-19 virus, his taking the life saving protocols established by our medical experts and presenting them to his followers as being some sort of political plot against America and against him so that they view their refusal to follow these protocols as an act of patriotism rather than as an act of complicity in murder, I can not longer countenance anyone who defends any or all of this.
Some will claim that I have denied this person his freedom of speech & thought. I disagree. He can share his beliefs with whoever is willing to hear him. I am not one of them.
I cannot look at the mass murder of what in the end will be 100’s of 1,000’s of Americans while the American democracy is being thrown into a freefall toward fascism and simply say that those who support what is happening just happen to have different opinions than do I. Just as I cannot say it about those Germans who filled the streets of their nation, offering the straight arm salute and shouting “Heil Hitler!”, I cannot say that now about those who cheer on Donald Trump as he marches our nation into the abyss. And I won’t. Not any longer. If you think Donald Trump is the Saviour of America, then you can unfriend me. If you evangelize about his “saviourship,” then I will be unfriending you. I can continue to like you as a person, I can continue to respect your LEGITIMATE conservative viewpoints, I can respect your allegiance to the Republican Party (in its ideal state), but if you choose to remain blind to all the horrible things that Donald Trump has done to America and the world, and you choose to sing his praises, I don’t want to hear it, not on Facebook, not anywhere. I cannot even say that we can “agree to disagree,” for if you believe in Trump, as far as I am concerned, you no longer believe in the America envisioned by our founders and our martyrs.
There will be those who call this statement a rant, and they will be right. I admit it. It is one. But it is better to rant now and try to make a difference than it is to remain silent until it is too late, when freedom is lost and blood is flowing on the streets of America. A dark image. Yes. God willing it never comes to pass. But as things stand now, with every passing day I sincerely fear that its realization draws closer.

Silver Linings and Rays of Hope: A COVID Reflection of Hope

May 23, 2020

This Shabbat, when we read Torah, we began our journey through its fourth book; the Book of NUMBERS.  As you may or may not know, the meaning of the Hebrew names of the books of the Torah do not necessarily match their English names.  The Book of NUMBERS is a perfect example.  In English, it is called “NUMBERS” because in its beginning, it does a deep dive into the taking of a census of the Israelites before they enter the Promised Land.  Its Hebrew name – BEMIDBAR – delivers quite a different message.  BEMIDBAR means “In the Wilderness.”

As I contemplated our entering the text of BEMIDBAR, I could not help but grasp the parallel with our own lives at this juncture of history.  For, like the newly liberated Israelites, we find ourselves wandering in a wilderness.  Just like our ancestors who were faced with the challenges of needing to traverse their wilderness, with all its difficulties and dangers, we, too, find ourselves faced with the challenges of needing to traverse a wilderness all our own.

Our wilderness is not like theirs.  It is not a wilderness which stretches across miles.  Its difficulties are not the burning desert sun, rough roads to travel, thirst and hunger.  Its dangers are not the fear of attacks from wild beasts, snakes, scorpions, and marauding tribes.  The difficulties and dangers of our wilderness come from this highly contagious and lethal disease which afflicts us today.  They are the difficulties embedded in our need to change our lives so dramatically in order to protect our lives; masks, physical distancing, sheltering at home, shortages at the grocery store, massive unemployment and the poverty and deprivations it entails, the upending of our world economy, the severely diminished education of our children, our inability to be in the physical presence of loved ones and friends, and, of course, the uncertainty of what the future holds for us – the new normal – and when that future will arrive.  As for the dangers, they are self-explanatory, or at least they should be, but for some inexplicable reason there are too many in our society who refuse to acknowledge them.  They are the dangers of our enormous vulnerability to a horrible disease which has the power to inflict unbelievable and prolonged suffering, and possible death, not to mention that unless we behave carefully and responsibly, we could bear the guilt of inflicting all of this upon others, including the people we love.  This is our wilderness.

Yes, the wilderness can be dark and dangerous, whether it be the wilderness of our ancestors or our own.  But even in its midst, there are silver linings and rays of hope which can be found.  Next Thursday evening, we as Jews will commence the celebration of one major silver lining, one major ray of hope, which our ancestors encountered in their wilderness. That silver lining, that ray of hope, changed the world and the history of humanity for all time, and changed it for the better.  The celebration I speak of, of course, is Shavuot, the festival of our receiving the Ten Commandments.  It was in the wilderness, with all its hardships, pain, and suffering, that our ancestors found themselves standing at the foot of Mount Sinai, and there, receiving directly from God, the ten most important rules which would, from that time forth, serve as the guiding principles for the advancement of humanity.

Like our ancestors, as we traverse our wilderness of COVID, there are silver linings and rays of hope to be found.  They do not diminish the hardships we must endure, just as the Ten Commandments did not diminish the hardships endured by our ancestors, but they can redeem our wilderness sojourn from being bereft of any meaning whatsoever, just as, in the same way, God’s gift of the Ten Commandments redeemed the wilderness sojourn of our ancestors.

Some may wonder:  What are these silver linings and these rays of hope which manifest themselves now, in our darkest hours?  They are rays of hope which have the potential to light the path to a better future in what eventually will be a post-COVID world.  But what are they?

One of them is that it has been determined that as a result of the pandemic and the restrictive changes in behavior that it has required of us, the amount of greenhouse gases in our atmosphere has been reduced by 17%, dropping to the levels of 2006.  This is but one of several positive impacts our lockdown has had on the environment, as we have been allowing nature to heal itself.  It shows us that if we can choose to change our behaviors, we can begin to ecologically repair our planet.  While it should go without saying that we cannot maintain lockdown protocols forever in order to save our planet, still we can change our attitude of “business as usual” and seriously engage in environmentally responsible behaviors, such as truly committing to the pursuit of alternative clean energy sources.  We have it within our ability to turn back the doomsday clock.

Another ray of hope found in our wilderness is that after 72-years of an ongoing Middle East conflict, it has taken this pandemic, with all its pain and suffering, to start to open a door for, at least a new beginning of Arab-Israeli cooperation.  Three Arab states – states that for all these years have been sworn enemies of Israel – the United Arab Emirates, Bahrain, and Kuwait – have turned to Israel for assistance in their struggles against the COVID-19 virus.  This is in no way a resolution to the Arab-Israeli conflict, but it is a glimmer of a recognition of how the countries of the Middle East need each other in order to survive and prosper.  It is but one step toward a resolution of this tragic conflict.  As we march into the future, this moment should not be lost or forgotten by its players, Hopefully it will serve as a building block toward a kinder, gentler Middle East.

Still another ray of hope is born out of the very anguish of our wilderness.  This public health crisis has only accentuated some of the social problems that long existed before the world ever heard of the Coronavirus.  Specifically, the fundamental injustices inherent in the vast socio-economic divide which exists in our nation and the dire consequences of our failure to humanely address that divide.  As we watch how this virus has devasted members of our economically disadvantaged community, way out of proportion to their numbers in our society, we can no longer ignore or turn a blind eye to the evils of runaway, abusive capitalism, the maintenance by way of neglect of a permanent underclass, and the innate evil of systemic racism.  These are intolerable conditions in a society which claims to be great, enlightened, and just. – “With Liberty and Justice for ALL.  If, after the nightmare of witnessing what this pandemic has done to the disadvantaged of our society, we do not commit ourselves to closing the socio-economic divide, then the guilt rests on our shoulders.  If nothing else, this crisis has shown us the necessity of our building a more just society, but we need to choose to act on it.

Still another ray of hope coming out of our current dilemma is that we can no longer afford to think in nationalistic terms.  Yes, we can be patriotically proud of our nation, but we cannot continue to view our nation as being superior or separate from the community of nations.  Last week, I watched Rachel Maddow interview Governor Andrew Cuomo of New York.  She asked an interesting and insightful question – “If you could turn back the clock to a time when you could have done something different in your response to the virus, when would that be and what would you have done differently?” His response was even more insightful. He said that while he was tempted to say March or February, actually he would have turned that clock back even earlier, to when we first were hearing about the outbreak in China.  With the wisdom of hindsight, he continued, saying that as soon as he heard of the Corona Virus outbreak in China, he would have started to prepare for its coming to New York. For, as he pointed out, in today’s world, when a virus strikes anywhere in the world, it can strike here tomorrow. All that is necessary is for one infected person to board a plane.  This pandemic should have taught us that we can no longer afford the foolishness of naively ignoring that we live in a global society.  Like it or not, we are intimately and inextricably bound to each other. Indeed, this is not new wisdom. As far back as 1624, the poet John Donne spoke of this reality when he penned his famous poem, “No Man Is an Island.” If, as a result of this pandemic, we can embrace this sense of international interdependence – that as a human race, we are at our best when our nations work together to build a better world – then the future we will build will be brighter and better than we ever dreamt.

Even in these dark hours, let us come to recognize and work to realize the lessons to be found in the silver linings and the rays of hope that, too, are products of this tragedy.  They cannot compensate for the suffering and the loss of life we have and we will endure, but they can show us the way to build a better world for tomorrow.  They redeem these days from the cruel fate of being totally meaningless blips of horror on the timeline of history.